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News

 

Events

 

Jun 2017 right left

   
01
02

Mid Ulster Vintage Rally

Saturday 3rd June
Springhill Moneymore
Adult £5, Child

Car Bazaar

Saturday 3rd June
Mount Stewart
Car £5, Van £10, Trailer £15

Yogurt Popsicles Show

Sunday 4th June
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission, Members Free

Scenic Forest Walk

Sunday 4th June
Florence Court
Normal Admission, Members Free

Ramble with our Ranger

Sunday 4th June
Castle Ward
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Dry Stone Walling

Sunday 4th June
Near Bryansford Village
Free

05

Biodiversity Training

Tuesday 6th June
Castle Espie, Portmore Lough
see above

07
08

Moth Night

Friday 9th June
Crom
Normal Admission, Members Free

Fishery Open Weekend

Saturday 10th June
Carrick–a–Rede
Normal Admission, Members Free

Open Book

Saturday 10th June
Castle Ward
Normal Admission, Members Free

Grass Roots Summer Outing

Saturday 10th June
TBC
Free

The Flaggy Shore

Saturday 10th June
Seamus Heaney HomePlace, Bellaghy
£10

11
12
13
14
15

Brexit – Implications for the Environment on the island of Ireland

Friday 16th June
Crowne Plaza Hotel, Dundalk
Free

Orchid Walk

Saturday 17th June
Portstewart Strand
Adult £2, Child £1

Bee Curious at Oxford Island

Saturday 17th June
Lough Neagh Discovery Centre
Free

Whitehead Peregrine Watch

Saturday 17th June
Beach Road, Whitehead
Free

Garden Fair

Sunday 18th June
Springhill Moneymore
Normal Admission, Members Free

Mid–Summer Walk

Sunday 18th June
Giant’s Causeway
Adult £7, Child £7

Rea’s Wood, Antrim – Himalayan Balsam Control

Sunday 18th June
Rea’s Wood Antrim
Free

19

Social Investment Clinic

Tuesday 20th June
Linen Hall Library, Belfast
Free

21
22
23

Get Mellow in the Meadow

Saturday 24th June
Minnowburn
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Rock Pool Picnic

Saturday 24th June
Kearney
Adult Free, Child £3

Specialist Plant Fair

Saturday 24th June
Mount Stewart
Normal Admission, Members Free

Outdoor Adventures

Sunday 25th June
Crom
Normal Admission, Members Free

Jazz in the Garden

Sunday 25th June
Mount Stewart
Normal Admission, Members Free

Marvellous Moths at Oxford Island

Sunday 25th June
Lough Neagh Discovery Centre
£5.00 for adults, £2.50 for children

26

Sustainability and Planning for the Future

Tuesday 27th June
Ranfurly House, Tower Room, Dungannon
Free

28
29
30
 
 

Spring has Sprung 8 February 2017

Forget the dark nights, spring has sprung

Later than last year, but spring is on the move.

Though you might be hard pressed to believe it, spring is well and truly on its way – that’s according to Mother Nature. Snowdrops, lesser celandine and other seasonal beauties are already on the march and have been recorded on the Woodland Trust’s Nature’s Calendar project.

So far in 2017 the conservation charity has received sightings, across the UK, of 32 different indicators of spring; including snowdrops at 234 locations, 129 records of hazel catkins and even 48 records of song thrush singing.

Although spring is definitely in the air, the Trust has received fewer records than this time last year, which is explained by colder temperatures in January 2017 compared to 2016.
In Northern Ireland the earliest flowering snowdrop recorded this year was on 4 January (at Newtownards in County Down). Last ‘spring’ the earliest snowdrop was particularly early and was in fact recorded on 28 December 2015 (near Kircubbin, County Down).

According to the charity, while the recent spate of cold weather may slow the advance of spring, it causes less of a problem than a late cold spell, when many more species may be flowering or awake from hibernation – as happened in 2013.

Judith Garforth, Woodland Trust Citizen Science Officer, said: “Recording signs of the changing seasons on Nature’s Calendar is hugely valuable to scientists and researchers who monitor its impact on nature. Although we’re seeing signs slightly later this year, we expect to see many more as things finally begin to warm up.”

Patrick Cregg is the director of the Woodland Trust in Northern Ireland and said: “The recent wintry weather may make you think it’s too early to look for signs of spring, but the clues are out there nonetheless and this is a great time to wrap up and get out and about.

“Look for lesser celandine flowering, hazel flowering, or even record your first lawn cut.
“We really need more people across Northern Ireland to play a part, and you don’t have to be an expert. Your records – no matter how few – will make a valuable contribution to scientific research.”

By recording natural seasonal signs, thousands of people have enabled Nature’s Calendar to become a vital survey into how climate change is affecting UK plants and wildlife. Find out more at http://www.naturescalendar.org.uk/

 

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